Advertisement

Private Umbilical Cord Blood Banks Under Scrutiny for Sub-Par Practices — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
April 28, 2014

Private Umbilical Cord Blood Banks Under Scrutiny for Sub-Par Practices

By Amy Orciari Herman

The "loosely regulated cord-blood-banking business" came under scrutiny in Saturday's Wall Street Journal. The paper's analysis of government inspections and lawsuits found "dirty storage conditions, leaky blood samples and firms going out of business."

There are roughly three dozen private umbilical cord blood banks in the U.S., the WSJ reports, and they usually charge parents about $2000 up front to store their newborn's cord blood, plus over $100 annually in fees. But handling and storage are far from perfect. One researcher noted that of 2000 samples she received from private banks, several hundred had to be rejected because they weren't sterile, hadn't been tested appropriately, or had too few cells to be useful.

The FDA doesn't have "a particular goal or statutory requirement" for private banks, an agency official told the WSJ, though the facilities are supposed to follow rules for safe handling.

One prominent pediatrician said: "I encourage families to use that money that you would use for private banking for a good stroller or car seat."

Reader Comments (1)

BRITTANNIA RODANICHE Other Healthcare Professional, Obstetrics/Gynecology, centro medico paitilla panama republic of panama

My experience collecting blood from umbilical cords after at term birth vaginal deliveries or cesarean have been excellent NONE HAVE BEEN CONTAMINATED OR REJECTED. the amount of cells are excellent. maybe the obstetricians that have collected blood from your strudy dont know how to do it.

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement