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Several Hospitals Stop Using Morcellators for Uterine Fibroids Following FDA Warning — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
April 25, 2014

Several Hospitals Stop Using Morcellators for Uterine Fibroids Following FDA Warning

By Kelly Young

The Cleveland Clinic and the University of Pennsylvania Health System are joining the list of hospitals that will temporarily stop performing morcellation to remove uterine fibroids, the Wall Street Journal reports. Last week, the FDA discouraged physicians from performing the procedure because of the risk for spreading undiagnosed uterine cancer.

Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston have also halted laparoscopic morcellation.

The chief of gynecologic oncology at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis said that some hospitals are moving quickly because of legal concerns. Barnes-Jewish is limiting morcellation to a few experienced surgeons who will use containment bags during the procedure to try to prevent any cancer from spreading.

Reader Comments (2)

Gael Deppert, JD Other, Indianapolis IN

I only wish my surgeon had mentioned he intended to morcellate a uterus from which cancer was identified post-operatively. He never discussed the procedure or the risks. The hospital where the surgery was conducted - the largest teaching hospital in Indiana - continues to allow morcellation, let alone with no eligibility guidelines or informed consents to be used by its physicians.

FERNANDO PIMAZONI Physician, Pathology, Botucatu, Sao Paulo State, Brazil

Being a surgical pathologist, this news is like music to me. I have found in multiple occasions that it is impossible to make any pathological examination in these specimens. They are horrible. I have already advised the women in my family and female friends to refuse this surgery if their GYN surgeon suggests.
Good News, indeed! And this described risk of cancer spread is no surprise, not at all!

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