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Featured in NEJM Journal Watch: Prehospital Electrocardiograms Improve MI Care — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
April 15, 2014

Featured in NEJM Journal Watch: Prehospital Electrocardiograms Improve MI Care

By the NEJM Journal Watch Editors

An observational study in England and Wales associates having a prehospital ECG with better MI care and outcomes. Those outcomes, according to a report in Heart, include a greater likelihood of undergoing reperfusion and lower 30-day mortality rate than those not having a prehospital ECG.

Reader Comments (5)

Carol Vassar, MD Physician, Internal Medicine, private practice

Management of heart disease tends to be less aggressive in England than in the US. The greater likelihood of reperfusion when a comparison EKG is available may just bring them closer to our rates. In the US, having the old EKG for comparison would be more likely to reduce hospital stays for acute coronary syndrome/ R/OMI when a RBBB, or T wave inversion or mild ST depression or any other possibly non acute abnormality is shown to be unchanged from past EKG's.

Jack Shapiro M.D Physician, Internal Medicine, Hospital&office

EKG's in patients with normal sinus rhythms and without symptoms are an absurd waste of time and resources. They twll you nothing you don't already know. For the Dx of M.I. biomarkers are the procedure of choice. EKG's give the first responders something to do while waiting for biomrkers to be reun.

dr vikas Physician, Anesthesiology, med college trauma center

Pre hospital e c g is good but who will read and treat.. rather at every p h c and chc hospital eg of small hospital s should have a tele conference center . So that it is connected live to higher centers

NYDER RODRIGUEZ OTERP Physician, Cardiology, CAMPINAS - SP - BRASIL

ITS THE BEST WAY TO GET UP TO DATE. EXCELLENT. CONGRATULATIONS !!!

Aernout somsen md phd Physician, Cardiology

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