Advertisement

Four Patients with Paraplegia Regain Muscle Movement Through Spinal Stimulation — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
April 9, 2014

Four Patients with Paraplegia Regain Muscle Movement Through Spinal Stimulation

By Amy Orciari Herman

Four patients with complete paralysis have recovered voluntary muscle control through electrical stimulation of the spine, according to a study in Brain.

All four had complete motor paralysis; two also had complete sensory paralysis. After implantation of a lumbosacral spinal cord stimulator (at least 2 years after injury), all patients were able to perform intentional leg movements in response to a verbal command. Movements were seen within days of starting stimulation and were enhanced over time when combined with daily physical therapy.

"Right now, the clinical perspective for individuals with complete motor paralysis is that there is nothing we can do," said the senior author in a National Institutes of Health press release. "I think we need to rethink that. In our study, we demonstrated potential beyond any expectation."

Reader Comments (2)

Mustun Shafick Natec Medical Ltd

I have a close relative of mine who has some sensory sensation but no motor capacity.Is it possible to have more information on this treatment.She has undergone a surgical operation of the spinal cord since 6 weeks.
Thank you for an answer
Regards
Shafick MUSTUN

Konstantinos Spigos, MD Physician, Neurology, Private Practice, Corfu, Greece

Promising results for a desperately wanted therapeutic advance.
Comparisons with shum procedure are the next step, since there is no proof that these results did not merely represent more effective motivation of paraparetic patients with an additional functional (for instance, hysterical) deficit.

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement