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New Atrial Fibrillation Guideline Incorporates New Oral Anticoagulants, Catheter Ablation — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
March 31, 2014

New Atrial Fibrillation Guideline Incorporates New Oral Anticoagulants, Catheter Ablation

By Larry Husten

A new guideline for the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) incorporates important information about the new oral anticoagulants and catheter ablation for the treatment of AF symptoms. The guideline was released Friday by the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology, and the Heart Rhythm Society.

Perhaps the biggest change since the previous 2006 guideline has been the introduction of new oral anticoagulants, including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, which can be used in some patients instead of warfarin for stroke prevention. Warfarin continues to be indicated for the treatment of AF in patients who have mechanical heart valves. The new agents are strongly recommended for use in patients with nonvalvular AF who are unable to maintain a therapeutic INR level with warfarin.

Catheter ablation also gets a strong recommendation when a rhythm control strategy is desired in patients with symptomatic AF refractory to at least one antiarrhythmic drug.

Adapted from CardioExchange

Reader Comments (1)

Jagadish Damle, MD Physician, Cardiology, Hoboken, NJ

Great help to stay current in my knowledge.

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