Advertisement

Anxiolytics and Hypnotics Associated with Long-Term Mortality Hazard — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
March 21, 2014

Anxiolytics and Hypnotics Associated with Long-Term Mortality Hazard

By Joe Elia

Use of anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs carries an increased mortality risk even after usage stops, according to a retrospective cohort study in BMJ.

Using the U.K.'s General Practice Research Database, researchers followed mortality in roughly 35,000 adults who'd received benzodiazepines; "Z" drugs such as Ambien and Sonata; other anxiolytics and hypnotics; or combinations of the three categories. Users were matched with some 70,000 other patients without such prescriptions.

During roughly 8 years of follow-up, there was an overall doubling of mortality risk among the users relative to controls (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.1). The risk remained significant after restricting the analysis to those who only received the drugs in the first year.

After excluding deaths in the first year of follow-up, the authors calculate that there were 4 excess deaths linked to drug use per 100 people followed over the 8-year period.

Reader Comments (1)

JOHN GRAY

This supports the blue cross/ blue shield of PA study showing a 4X-6X mortality in 12,000 regular users ( 60-180 nights/yr and 180 + nights/yr) ages 15-75; compared to 25,000 age/disease matched controls. These drugs should be used carefully.
John W. Gray MD

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement