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More Common Tests and Treatments That Pediatricians Should Question — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
March 18, 2014

More Common Tests and Treatments That Pediatricians Should Question

By Kelly Young

The American Academy of Pediatrics has published a new list of five tests and treatments for children that may not be necessary, as part of the Choosing Wisely campaign. They include:

  • Preterm infants should not be prescribed high-dose dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg daily) to prevent or treat bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  • Patients should not be screened for food allergies with IgE tests before their full medical history is considered.

  • Use of acid blockers and motility agents like metoclopramide should be avoided for physiologic gastroesophageal reflux that is "effortless, painless, and not affecting growth." Avoid medicating infants who are "happy-spitters."

  • Surveillance urine cultures should generally not be used to screen and treat asymptomatic bacteruria.

  • Parents should avoid routinely using infant home apnea monitors to prevent sudden infant death syndrome.

Reader Comments (4)

Isabel Physician, Pediatrics/Adolescent Medicine, Private Practice

I think all of these tests and treatment should be followed. There should be no question or doubt about them.

Gerald Kilpatrick Physician, Pediatrics/Adolescent Medicine, florida

Right on! Have told patients and doctors this for years. Also not all ear infections should be treated and half the time The ER dx is wrong any way. Unfortunately, some peds still over treat or can't dx.

marc nudelman Physician, Pediatrics/Adolescent Medicine, pvt practice

These are current standards of care which we have had in place for quite some time. Nothing new here for the up-to-date Pediatrician.

arun chatterjee Physician, Pediatrics/Adolescent Medicine

all these are standard practice & should be followed.

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