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15-Minute-Faster Stroke Treatment Could Add a Month to Healthy Life Span — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
March 14, 2014

15-Minute-Faster Stroke Treatment Could Add a Month to Healthy Life Span

By Joe Elia

Speeding the time between stroke onset and intravenous thrombolysis translates to measurable benefits in healthy life span, according to a study in Stroke.

Researchers followed some 2300 patients in Australian and Finnish centers between 1998 and 2011. All were treated with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) within 270 minutes of stroke onset. Using results from earlier randomized studies on tPA's effects, the researchers estimated the benefits — in disability-adjusted life years — of prompt treatment for their patients.

They found that each minute saved between stroke onset and tPA treatment bought about 2 days of disability-free life span — or about a month for a 15-minute speed-up. The effect was smaller among older patients.

Reader Comments (1)

Dr. V Kantariya MD Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice

Time of the Essence in Stroke thrombolysis.During stroke 1.9million nerval cells die each minute, ischemic brain ages about 3.6years each hour-needed rapid therapy..STROKE a Tale of Two Worlds: Age-adjusted stroke Mortality (per 100000)in Russia 251, and in US 32 (ISC 2009).Waste no Time!

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