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FDA Taking a Closer Look at Drugs Made in India — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
February 18, 2014

FDA Taking a Closer Look at Drugs Made in India

By Kelly Young

Drug makers in India are coming under increased FDA scrutiny over counterfeit products, safety problems, and faked test results, the New York Times reports. The country provides roughly 40% of the over-the-counter and generic prescription drugs purchased in the U.S.

FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg arrived in India last week to discuss drug safety and the "recent lapses in quality at a handful of pharmaceutical firms."

FDA inspections of Indian drug plants have increased threefold since 2009, which has resulted in many new penalties, including a $500 million fine and felony charges for generic maker Ranbaxy.

One in five drugs manufactured in India is counterfeit, according to World Health Organization estimates reported by the Times. Counterfeits at a pediatric hospital in Kashmir may have played a part in hundreds of infant deaths over several years.

Reader Comments (1)

Nancy Madej Other, Other

Congressman Lou Barletta of Pa. had a druggist on a radio show who asked him to help stop the generic drugs from India that there were too many problems and also not equivelant to brand name.

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