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Lyrica Shows Promise in Restless Legs Syndrome — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
February 13, 2014

Lyrica Shows Promise in Restless Legs Syndrome

By Amy Orciari Herman

Pregabalin — marketed as Lyrica to treat pain and epilepsy — helps relieve restless legs syndrome (RLS) without a high risk for symptom augmentation, according to an industry-funded study in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Some 700 adults with moderate-to-severe RLS were randomized to daily pregabalin (300 mg) or pramipexole (0.25 or 0.5 mg) for 52 weeks, or to placebo for 12 weeks followed by 40 weeks of one of the active treatments.

Pregabalin was associated with a significant improvement in RLS symptoms relative to placebo at 12 weeks. Symptom scores also favored pregabalin relative to pramipexole at both 12 and 52 weeks. The rate of symptom augmentation (i.e., symptoms that became worse than they were before treatment) was significantly lower with pregabalin than with higher-dose pramipexole (2% vs. 8%).

In NEJM Journal Watch, Allan Brett concludes: "If pregabalin eventually is approved for use in RLS, it will provide one more alternative to dopamine agonists."

Reader Comments (1)

Wendy Bolt

Has anyone tried magnesium supplementation? "Restless legs" is obviously a symptom of low magnesium (could also be low potassium). Psych drug are NOT the answer. Look to correcting nutritional deficiencies for a truly safe and effective solution.

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