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More Children Getting Their Caffeine from Coffee and Energy Drinks — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
February 11, 2014

More Children Getting Their Caffeine from Coffee and Energy Drinks

By Kelly Young

Children and teens are increasingly getting their caffeine from coffee and energy drinks, according to a Pediatrics study.

Using dietary recall data from the 1999–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), researchers assessed caffeine intake of children and young adults aged 2 to 22 years. They found that nearly three quarters drank caffeine on a given day, a proportion that held relatively stable over the decade. Soda accounted for 62% of caffeine intake in 1999, dropping to 38% in 2010. Coffee's influence increased from 10% to 24%, and energy drinks, which were not a category in 1999, accounted for 6% of caffeine consumption in 2010.

Reader Comments (1)

Moti Gurbaxani Retired

This sure is a novel approach. After reading few articles I tried a very low dose of Niacin ,@10-15 mg (taken ONLY regularly irregular) with ATORVASTATIN 40mg & 81 mg Aspirin,these two regularly taken. This Regime I followed for about a year and got my lipid profile done,I & my buddy cardiologist could NOT BELIEVE THE RESULTS, HDL 75 mg/ dL , LDL 50mg/dL & TG 15mg/ dL.
I have never been able to repeat these results,close but NOT THE SAME . AT MY AGE OF 82, I am not going to repeatedly take NIACIN REGULARLY, AS IT IS MY HDL HAS ALWAYS BEEN GOOD IN THE LAST 25 years. When I ran marathons my HDL TOUCHED THE MARK OF 99.5mg/ dL, my pathologist asked me to repeat the test and it was 100mg/ dL, that kept him satisfied.
I must add I have always been an aerobic exerciser .
Moti

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