Advertisement

Cognitive Therapy Reduces Schizophrenia Symptoms in Patients Who Refuse Medication — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
February 6, 2014

Cognitive Therapy Reduces Schizophrenia Symptoms in Patients Who Refuse Medication

By Amy Orciari Herman

Cognitive therapy helps reduce schizophrenia symptoms in patients who refuse drug therapy, according to a pilot study in the Lancet.

Seventy-four patients who'd chosen not to take medication for psychosis were randomized to cognitive therapy plus usual care or usual care alone. Cognitive therapy included some 30 sessions over 18 months.

The cognitive therapy group had lower schizophrenia symptom scores throughout the study, versus usual care alone. The benefits were seen largely for positive symptoms (e.g., hallucinations) rather than negative ones (e.g., apathetic social avoidance).

Peter Roy-Byrne, a psychiatrist with NEJM Journal Watch, commented: "This is a promising finding, but the sample size is small and may have included selected patients more able to tolerate psychotic symptoms without severe functional impact. Because studies of psychotherapy alone (without medication) as treatment for other severe disorders (e.g., bipolar disorder, ADHD) have not shown positive effects, this promising lead must be followed up in larger, more real-world samples to demonstrate generalizability."

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement