Advertisement

CDC: Traffic Deaths Among Children Dropped 43% Over the Decade — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
February 5, 2014

CDC: Traffic Deaths Among Children Dropped 43% Over the Decade

By Kelly Young

Deaths from motor vehicle crashes in children aged 12 and under fell 43% from 2002 to 2011, according to an MMWR article.

However, a third of all children who died in motor vehicle accidents in 2011 were not restrained. The 8- to 12-year age group had the highest proportion of unrestrained deaths.

The authors advise that children aged 12 and under should always sit in the back seat in these age- and size-appropriate restraints:

  • rear-facing child safety seats to age 2 years;

  • forward-facing car seats up to at least 5 years;

  • booster seats at least through age 8 years, and until the seat belt fits across the shoulder (recommended height: 57 inches);

  • seat belts in children who outgrow booster seats.

Reader Comments (1)

Arthur Yeager, DMD, MMH Other Healthcare Professional, Dentistry, Retired

Considering all of the progress that has been accomplished in child passenger protection, it is astonishing that Federal Standards do not require installation of seat belts on all newly manufactured big, yellow school buses. Most children ride restrained on their first trip home from the hospital and continue in safety seats until they enter kindergarten and travel to school, unrestrained on the school bus.

With crash studies, accident investigations and good old common sense dictating belt installation, for decades implementation has been pervasively impeded by school bus officials and Federal authorities.

Our nation has no more precious asset than our children. How can we permit 25 million kids ride back and forth to school every school day unrestrained?

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement