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Shingles Pain Lowered in Preliminary Trial by Blocking an Angiotensin Receptor — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
February 5, 2014

Shingles Pain Lowered in Preliminary Trial by Blocking an Angiotensin Receptor

By Joe Elia

Blocking a novel angiotensin receptor with no known cardiovascular role produced a reduction in postherpetic neuralgia in a small, industry-conducted, phase II study in the Lancet.

Researchers randomized 183 patients with postherpetic neuralgia of more than 6 months' duration to 4 weeks of daily treatment with an oral angiotensin II type 2 blocker (AT2B) or placebo. The primary outcome was the change in self-reported pain intensity between baseline and the final week of therapy. Pain was measured on an 11-point scale from 0 to 10.

AT2B recipients showed a significantly greater drop in pain scores than those on placebo, but the effect size at the dosage used was small — a roughly 0.7-point difference on the scale between groups.

AT2B's side effects included pharyngitis, headache, and allergic dermatitis.

Reader Comments (1)

Jose GROS-AYMERICH Physician, Oncology, INSS -Retired

Reported is a reduction in Shingles' Pain by oral AT2B; years ago, the same was proposed for the Anti H2 Cimetidine, that seems having also some activity against ColoRectal Cancer Cells. A common mechanism of action? Does the finding deserve studying combined AT2B plus Cimetidine? Opinions welcome, thanks. Salut

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