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Dangerous Rapid Calcification Observed in Pediatric Patients After Aortic Valve Replacement — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 23, 2014

Dangerous Rapid Calcification Observed in Pediatric Patients After Aortic Valve Replacement

By Larry Husten

Pediatric cardiac surgeons at Boston Children's Hospital are warning about a potentially fatal problem in children and young adults who received a bioprosthetic cardiac valve.

The surgeons initially became concerned when a young, asymptomatic patient died suddenly after her valve underwent rapid calcification, only 7 months after a routine follow-up echocardiogram found no signs of blockage.

In recent years, surgeons started using the Sorin Mitroflow valve, which is made from bovine tissue, in the aortic position. Following the death last year of the patient, who received the Mitroflow in 2011, doctors at BCH began an intense surveillance of all 18 patients at their institution who had received the Mitroflow valve in the aortic position. They found four additional cases of rapid calcification (three patients had their valves replaced with a mechanical valve; the other is being watched closely).

BCH is now recommending that children with the Mitroflow valve be followed every 4 to 6 months so problems can be caught before an event occurs.

Adapted from CardioExchange

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