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Autism Diagnoses Will Likely Drop Under DSM-5 — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 23, 2014

Autism Diagnoses Will Likely Drop Under DSM-5

By Amy Orciari Herman

Autism diagnoses will likely decline as clinicians adopt new criteria from DSM-5, according to a JAMA Psychiatry study.

Researchers retrospectively applied the new diagnostic criteria to a U.S. database that included nearly 650,000 children (age, 8 years) living in autism surveillance regions in 2006 or 2008. Some 6600 children met DSM-IV criteria for autism spectrum disorder.

Roughly 20% of the children meeting the DSM-IV criteria failed to meet DSM-5 criteria. The researchers calculated that the prevalence of autism in 2008 would have been 10.0 per 1000 children if DSM-5 criteria had been used, versus 11.3 per 1000 using DSM-IV criteria.

Barbara Geller, a psychiatrist with NEJM Journal Watch, commented: "Given the myriad genetic and environmental factors that increase autism risk and contribute to clinical presentation, diagnostic challenges are not surprising and are likely to continue."

Reader Comments (1)

Juan Carlos García Salazar Physician, Neurology, Centro Neurológico de Occidente. Quetzaltenango. Guatemala.

It's of great help to keep you updated!

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