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Early Vitamin D Status in Multiple Sclerosis Predicts Course — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 21, 2014

Early Vitamin D Status in Multiple Sclerosis Predicts Course

By Joe Elia

Higher vitamin D levels within a year after the early manifestations of multiple sclerosis are linked to better clinical outcomes, according to a JAMA Neurology article.

For 5 years, investigators followed over 400 patients suspected to be in the early stage of MS. Those with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL) or more during the first year, when compared with patients having lower values, showed less progression during the 5 years' observation. The higher-level patients had "a 4-times lower change in T2 lesion volume, a 2-fold lower rate of brain atrophy, and lower disability."

The authors note that their findings concur with earlier evidence although they don't offer a possible explanation for the effect. They say the results "suggest that identification and correction of vitamin D insufficiency has an important role in the early treatment of MS."

Reader Comments (3)

ADELMO GOMES MACHADO Hospital Samaritano do RJ/ Ministério da Saúde do Brasil

Until this moment I always avoids send un judjments definitive, but in this case I think so.

ADELMO GOMES MACHADO Physician, Internal Medicine, HOspital Samaritano do Rio de Janeiro

I agree with the authors, when they sad:"...the identification and correction of vit D insufficiency has a important role in the early treatment of Multiple Sclerosis˜..../ But just it.

David Foster, MD Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice, Clinic

Which is the cart, which is the horse? In other diseases, vit. D levels fell from disease activity, but raising the vit. D levels did not alter the course/severity. It was a marker, not the cause - might this also be the case?

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