Advertisement

Zinc Shortage Linked to Zinc Deficiency Disorder in Infants on Parenteral Nutrition — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 17, 2014

Zinc Shortage Linked to Zinc Deficiency Disorder in Infants on Parenteral Nutrition

By Cara Adler

Nationwide shortages of injectable zinc, a component of parenteral nutrition, have led to zinc deficiency disorder in seven infants with cholestasis, according to MMWR.

The shortage began in late 2012, when one of two U.S. producers experienced manufacturing delays. The CDC investigated three cases of zinc deficiency reported in Washington, D.C., in December 2012 and four reported in Houston in January 2013. The infants were given parenteral nutrition without zinc after the hospitals had run out of supplies. Severe dermatitis, bacterial infections, or both, developed 4 to 34 weeks after parenteral nutrition was started. Other known complications of zinc deficiency include liver and kidney failure.

The FDA is allowing importation of injectable zinc until domestic supplies are restored (a link to FDA information on availability is provided below). In the meantime, the authors recommend that clinicians reserve limited supplies for the highest-risk infants (premature, very low birth weight, gastrointestinal dysfunction) and monitor patients who receive parenteral nutrition without zinc for signs of deficiency.

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement