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Heavy Drinking in Middle-Aged Men Found to Speed Cognitive Decline — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 16, 2014

Heavy Drinking in Middle-Aged Men Found to Speed Cognitive Decline

By Joe Elia

Middle-aged men drinking 36 g or more of alcohol per day (roughly equivalent to three 12-oz. bottles of beer, or three glasses of wine, or three shots of liquor) experience more rapid cognitive decline than those drinking moderately or less, according to a Neurology study.

Some 5000 men and 2000 women — all British civil servants — self-reported their alcohol consumption levels three times over a 10-year period. Then, over the ensuing 10 years, beginning at roughly age 56, they underwent cognitive testing on three occasions to measure age-related declines.

Declines were steeper among men who were heavy drinkers. In women, an effect was seen starting at the 19-g/day consumption level, but it did not reach statistical significance. The authors say the decline among heavy-drinking men showed an effect size ranging from 2 to 6 extra years of cognitive decline over the 10 years of observation.

Reader Comments (3)

Ajibola Meraiyebu PhD Other Healthcare Professional, Neurology, Bingham University

I also carried out a research work on the effect of alcohol on learning memory in rats using the Y-Maze . The result was quite similar to your findings. The rats that took the moderate alcohol had the best memory test results.

ikran ali Medical Student, Other, student

Assalamuo alaikum I am a medical student and I need to joint this site.

LaRita Skelton, C.Ph.T. Other Healthcare Professional, Pharmacology/Pharmacy, Emory University Hospital

Oh my! Maybe you should share this with your BIL. I think it includes "sneak drinking". :-)

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