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Study Dispels "Obesity Paradox" in Diabetes — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 16, 2014

Study Dispels "Obesity Paradox" in Diabetes

By Amy Orciari Herman

A study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds no evidence of a so-called "obesity paradox" in type 2 diabetes — that is, the suggestion that mortality is lower among diabetics who are overweight or obese than among those who are normal weight.

Researchers studied over 11,000 healthcare professionals who were free of cardiovascular disease or cancer at the time of diabetes diagnosis. During 16 years' follow-up, roughly 3000 participants died.

Overall, the association between baseline BMI and all-cause mortality was J-shaped: Compared with normal-weight participants, underweight participants and those with BMIs of 30 or above had significantly increased mortality risks, with the highest risk at BMIs of 35 or higher (hazard ratio, 1.33).

Previous studies that suggested an obesity paradox were limited by short follow-ups and few deaths, the authors write. They conclude that maintaining a healthy weight "should remain the cornerstone of diabetes management."

Reader Comments (2)

paul helman,MD northshore university health systems

All of which confirms to me the need to severly limit carbohydrate macronutrient portion of our diet. The primary cause of obesity is hormoanl, namely insulin, and it is the hormone everyone can control. Obesity, of course, has nothing to do with calories in calories out. If you can digest that concept I might also inform you that the Sun no longer rotates around the Earth.

KOLLAR JOZEF Other Healthcare Professional, Cardiology, Pensioner

This article is more thena Great surprize.

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