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Endovascular Repair for Ruptured AAA Not Associated with Better Mortality Rate — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 15, 2014

Endovascular Repair for Ruptured AAA Not Associated with Better Mortality Rate

By Kelly Young

Emergency endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms did not improve 30-day mortality rates, compared with open repair, in a multicenter study in BMJ.

Over 600 patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms were randomized to either the standard treatment of emergency open repair or to an endovascular strategy, which included computed tomography and emergency endovascular aneurysm repair. In the latter group, patients deemed unsuitable for endovascular repair underwent open repair.

Overall, 30-day mortality did not differ significantly between the groups (roughly 35% in each). However, among women, endovascular repair appeared to be more effective, with 30-mortality rates of 37% in the endovascular group versus 57% in the open-repair group.

Costs did not differ appreciably between the groups.

Reader Comments (1)

Henry Farkas, MD, MPH Physician, Emergency Medicine

Even if endovascular repair had the same mortality as open repair, the time to full recovery from surgery had to be much less in the endovascular repair group compared to the open repair group.

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