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USPSTF Recommends Gestational Diabetes Screening After 24 Weeks — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 14, 2014

USPSTF Recommends Gestational Diabetes Screening After 24 Weeks

By Kelly Young

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that asymptomatic pregnant women be screened for gestational diabetes after 24 weeks' gestation to reduce the risks for preeclampsia, fetal macrosomia, and fetal shoulder dystocia. The final guidelines are published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Prior to 24 weeks, the USPSTF says there's not enough evidence to recommend for or against screening. However, if a woman presents early in pregnancy with signs of diabetes, then clinicians should use their best judgment on whether to screen the patient early, the task force notes.

Reader Comments (2)

sandeep julka DM endocrinologist Physician, Endocrinology, India, Indore, MP

While most of our recommendations should be based on RCT s but as was pointed out by the recent paper on Patient centered approach, Editors of Diabetes care, 13 taught leaders, RCTs too may not be very representative of the population in the clinic. As far as the Indian population (south east Asian) must test first ante natal visit then at 24 weeks and again at 32 weeks. The fact there are so many girls with PCOS and IGT and IFG we are sure to miss pre existing DM in these girls.

Heidi Peterson, MD Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice, 562 Washington Stree, South Attleboro, MA 02703

As a preceptor for Family Medicine residents and a Family Medicine Physician doing OB, I recommend ASLO screening between 24 and 28 weeks if the earlier screen was negative.

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