Advertisement

Nearly Half of Adults Hospitalized with Flu This Season Are Obese — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 13, 2014

Nearly Half of Adults Hospitalized with Flu This Season Are Obese

By the Editors

Some 47% of adults hospitalized with influenza since October have been obese — substantially higher than the 30%-35% rate seen in previous flu seasons — according to the CDC's weekly FluView report.

Overall, patients under age 4 years and those aged 65 or older were most likely to be admitted with flu, but adults aged 18 to 64 still accounted for 61% of hospitalizations. Nearly all hospitalized cases were attributed to the 2009 H1N1 strain, which continues to be the dominant strain this season.

Reader Comments (3)

Carol S. Ramsey, D.O. Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice, Independent contractor

I enjoy hearing these updates.

Patrick McCann, MD Physician, Emergency Medicine

I wonder if our percentage of healthy obese patients mirrors this? Scary thought.

N.A. Davis, PhD Other, Other, California

What inference are we meant to draw from the increase in the proportion of patients hospitalized with flu? (We should, of course, draw NO inference from it: there are just too many variables involved.) But that's not the writers' intention, clearly. It's distressing to find that careless fat-shaming and blaming is embraced even in these pages, and by professionals.

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement