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Lung Cancer Incidence Is Dropping Most Rapidly in Men and Younger Adults — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 10, 2014

Lung Cancer Incidence Is Dropping Most Rapidly in Men and Younger Adults

By Cara Adler

From 2005 to 2009, lung cancer incidence among U.S. adults decreased more rapidly in men than in women and in people aged 35 to 44 than in other age groups, according to a CDC analysis of national cancer registries published in MMWR.

Declines were noted among men in 23 states and all regions of the country and among women in 7 states and the South and West. Despite the more rapid decrease in men, the average annual incidence remained higher in men than in women (82.9 vs. 55.7 per 100,000 population).

Noting that the declines reflect changes in tobacco use, the authors call for "continued attention and support to proven population-based tobacco prevention and control strategies."

Reader Comments (1)

ROGER FELIX Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice, Albuquerque

This is very interesting. Not surprising, either. This information dovetails quite well with the obesity epidemic (with increasing consumption of calorie-dense foods and decreasing physical activity) and the crazy advertising/pop culture expectations for women's appearance. Far too many young women are still using cigarettes as a diet aid. Until that slows down, women's lung cancer incidence won't.

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