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Study Supports Cognitive Rest Following Concussion in Children — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 7, 2014

Study Supports Cognitive Rest Following Concussion in Children

By Kelly Young

High levels of cognitive activity following concussion are associated with longer time to recovery, according to a study in Pediatrics. The authors say this supports recent guidelines recommending cognitive rest post-concussion.

Researchers studied some 330 patients who presented to a pediatric sports concussion clinic within 3 weeks of sustaining a concussion. Patients rated their level of cognitive activity at each follow-up visit. Those who were in the top quartile of cognitive activity scores, meaning they were the most mentally active after their concussion, had the longest time until symptom resolution.

The authors say that post-concussion cognitive rest — which limits activities requiring concentration, like reading, texting, playing video games, and doing schoolwork — may allow the brain to conserve ATP for injury recovery.

Reader Comments (2)

Kelly Young Other, Other, Physician's First Watch

The authors were not that specific. They just divided patients by quartiles of cognitive activity-days. However, they do quote the Second International Conference on Concussion in Sport from 2004, which said, "“During this period of recovery in the first few days
after an injury, it is important to emphasize to the athlete that physical and cognitive rest is required."

Robert M Haile MD Physician, Other, MMC

Duration of rest?

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