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Featured in NEJM Journal Watch: Avoidable Antibiotic Exposure for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
December 23, 2013

Featured in NEJM Journal Watch: Avoidable Antibiotic Exposure for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections

By the NEJM Journal Watch Editors

In a retrospective analysis of patients with skin and soft tissue infections in a large ambulatory care system, therapy for 10 days or longer was the most common avoidable use of antibiotics. Commenting on the American Journal of Medicine study, ID specialist Neil Ampel points out that nearly two thirds of patients with uncomplicated cellulitis got antibiotics active against MRSA, "a practice that many would consider inappropriate."

Reader Comments (3)

J. Garich, PharmD Other Healthcare Professional, Pharmacology/Pharmacy, Hospital

This goes along with research this year reporting that over 80% of pharyngitis dx were given antibiotics, eg z pack, when the IDSA doesn't recommend that unless the sx don't resolve in 3 days. Most cases are due to viral etiology and the authors of this report mentioned that the expected rate of antibiotic TC was in the range of 20%. This got to admit there is an issue here! Often I see comments that place blame on patients expectations. That seems to be shifting the accountability to me. As a pharmacist I think we have a big hand in blame since filling the RX is up to us and we should hold to strict adherence to gold standard guidelines!

Bert ELIASON Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice

It seems like these are criticisms made by specialists who do not treat patients. It is often hard to get a good culture from cellutltis therefore one has to treat empirically. We know the MRSA is a common cause of cellulitis. Especially in patients with comorbidities.

Lynne hopkins md Physician, Infectious Disease, Orange County health dept

Thank you

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