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Pediatrics Group Says Pregnant Women and Children Should Avoid Raw Milk — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
December 17, 2013

Pediatrics Group Says Pregnant Women and Children Should Avoid Raw Milk

By Kelly Young

Pregnant women, infants, and children should not consume raw dairy products, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends in a new policy statement in Pediatrics.

Raw dairy consumption has been associated with increased risks for toxoplasmosis and listeriosis among pregnant women, as well as E. coli-related diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome among young children.

The group also recommends banning the sale of unpasteurized dairy products and urges pediatricians to contact their state representatives in support of a ban. Currently, at least 30 states allow the sale of raw milk.

Reader Comments (2)

Ray H Wiser MD Physician, Surgery, General, Retired

Using raw dairy products markedly increases the exposure to Mycobacterium avium intracellulare, var. paratuberculosis. The UK accepts it as a factor in Chron's Disease, the US does not. Johnes disease of cattle , with the same pathophysiology as Chrons is rampant in US dairy herds. The only "cures" of that disorder in my practice have followed 2 or more years of Rx with rifabutin and clarithromycin. recent recognition has been presented by: Michael Gregor MD in: http://www.mad-cow.org/00/paraTB.html Of course, peptic ulcer disease was not infectious pre- Helicobacter.

Dan Black, DO/AAPMR/ACOPMR/ABPM/ Sub specialty Sports Med Physician, Other, Holzer Health Systems

Seems too little too late.The percapita impact is small, compared to the benefit. The stuff in our food chain and in commercial products is significantly more damaging. The age of the Killer Bug is upon us, ABX are falling short. The government supported food web, sedentary behaviors and Gaming is literally KILLING our youth. Happy Holidays

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