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Merry Christmas from BMJ: James Bond's Alcohol Problem, a Creepy Hospital Clock, and Bradys' Bradycardia — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
December 13, 2013

Merry Christmas from BMJ: James Bond's Alcohol Problem, a Creepy Hospital Clock, and Bradys' Bradycardia

By Kelly Young

James Bond may prefer his martinis "shaken, not stirred" because of an alcohol-related tremor, according to research in BMJ's cheeky Christmas edition.

Researchers read 14 of Ian Fleming's novels and calculated how many alcoholic beverages the spy consumed. Not including the days when Bond was unable to drink (e.g., due to incarceration), he averaged 92 alcoholic units weekly. The authors conclude: "The level of functioning as displayed in the books is inconsistent with the physical, mental, and indeed sexual functioning expected from someone drinking this much alcohol. We advise an immediate referral."

Also in the holiday issue, researchers report that one Tuesday, a rheumatology patient complained that the clock in his hospital room was telling him to die. Indeed, the clock read "DIE." "Dienstag" is the German word for Tuesday. The clock's language settings were adjusted so it read "TUE," and the patient lived.

And finally, people in Dublin with the last name Brady apparently have a higher rate of pacemaker implantation for bradycardia than people with other last names (1.38% vs. 0.61%). The authors conclude: "Further research could include investigating increased rates of obesity in the Fatt family or depression in people whose surname is Lowe."

This writer, for one, is thrilled with this latest news and is hopeful that she won't have to stockpile antiwrinkle cream.

Reader Comments (2)

KATHLEEN COX KULLMAN Medical Student, Emergency Medicine

great variety of content

Katherine Sutherland, MD Physician, Obstetrics/Gynecology

Examples of medicine at its worst....

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