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CPAP Can Help Reduce Blood Pressure in Apnea Patients with Resistant Hypertension — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
December 11, 2013

CPAP Can Help Reduce Blood Pressure in Apnea Patients with Resistant Hypertension

By Amy Orciari Herman

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) leads to improved blood pressure in patients with sleep apnea and resistant hypertension, a JAMA study finds.

Nearly 200 adults with primary resistant hypertension and apnea were randomized to CPAP or no CPAP while continuing their antihypertensive medications. During 12 weeks' treatment, CPAP patients used the therapy an average of 5 hours per night.

CPAP conferred a significant, 3.1-mm-Hg greater drop in 24-hour mean blood pressure relative to no therapy. In addition, CPAP patients were significantly more likely than controls to have dips in their average nighttime blood pressure (36% vs. 22%).

Thomas Schwenk, a family practitioner with NEJM Journal Watch, says the observed drop in blood pressure is "probably clinically important, although studies with actual clinical outcomes are still needed."

Reader Comments (1)

lorie

NONE OF MY DOCTORS PRIMARY NOR CARDIAC EVER ADDRESS MY DIAGNOSED SLEEP APNEA EVEN THOUGH I HAVE ARRYTHMIA

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