Advertisement

Early Docetaxel Plus Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
December 9, 2013

Early Docetaxel Plus Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

By Kelly Young

The early addition of the chemotherapy drug docetaxel to androgen-deprivation therapy is associated with increased survival among patients with metastatic prostate cancer, compared with ADT alone, according to interim results released early by the National Institutes of Health because of their "practice-changing" implications.

Nearly 800 men with metastatic prostate cancer were randomized to ADT alone or ADT plus docetaxel every 3 weeks for 18 weeks. Three-year survival rates were significantly higher in the chemotherapy group (69% vs. 53% in ADT alone). Patients whose cancer had spread to major organs or had four or more bone lesions accounted for most of the observed benefit.

Oncologist Robert Dreicer with NEJM Journal Watch comments: "Data provided from this interim analysis suggests that men with very poor risk — i.e., extensive disease burden — may benefit the most from this approach. Full data will be presented at an upcoming scientific meeting. This data will likely alter the management of some patients presenting with metastatic prostate cancer."

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement