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How Do You Study for Your Recertification Exams? — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
December 3, 2013

How Do You Study for Your Recertification Exams?

By the Editors

The NEJM Group would like to learn about how you approach studying for your recertification exams. Please take the brief survey below — it should take just a few minutes.

For each completed survey, the NEJM Group will donate $2 to Doctors Without Borders toward their efforts to support Typhoon Haiyan survivors.

Reader Comments (24)

joel

recent reviewer edition and AAFP publications

Yaser Siraj

Board review course!

jordanmeyers M.D Physician, Pediatrics/Adolescent Medicine, office based

Use old board questions and AAP prep

jordanmeyers Physician, Pediatrics/Adolescent Medicine, office based

Use old examination questions/

MARTHA HIDALGO Physician, Internal Medicine, Eau Claire, WI

MKSAP , Board Review Courses.

leonard baker Other Healthcare Professional, alaska

My study for recertification was to read articles, and to use a study guide book with questions and answers.

Nihal Ozdemir Other Healthcare Professional, Pediatric Subspecialty, Istanbul University

Read a textbook and check the important publications in the preceding year

Sarah Apollo DO

Old test questions was the best method

Tania Hernandez Resident, Family Medicine/General Practice, Skagit Valley Hospital

I try to do as many questions as I can

KHALIL KATATO Physician, Oncology, office based

I wish I see questions of relevant clinical value in the test rather than rare diseases and scenarios that are are buried in textbooks and questions banks. test supposed to evaluate your daily clinical knowledge and skills , I do not think it does !!

Robert Gibbons Physician, Internal Medicine, Research Institute

Review series - MedStudy with some MKSAP.

Elizabeth Hudson, DO, MPH Physician, Infectious Disease, Kaiseer

Using MKSAP, other board review classes

Ati Urban Yates MD FACP Physician, Hospital Medicine, hospital

I am especially looking for prep materials for the ABIM Focused Practice in Hospital Medicine exam. Using standard board review materials (eg MKSAP, other question based) as well as ABIM modules, with UpToDate and some related references as background study for questions I have going through. AUY

Jon M. Greif, DO, FACS Physician, Surgery, Specialized, Oakland CA

This is a major nuisance to study the entire breadth of general surgery as I have limited my practice to breast cancer and diseases of the breast for more than 10 years. Hopefully, some day the American Board of Surgery will devise a recertification process for subspecialty surgical practices. I'm studying SESAP and took a review course at this year's ACS Clinical Congress.

Deborah Lindsly MD Physician, Internal Medicine, VA clinic

none

DONALD BERNSTEIN Physician, Geriatrics, office

ABIM modules and GRS and Harvard Geriatric Conference.

Suo Lee, MD Physician, Internal Medicine, Carney Hospital

I use MKSAP. And questions. I also took a month off to study for my last recert.

Suo Lee, MD Physician, Internal Medicine, Carney Hospital

I use MKSAP. And questions. I also took a month off to study for my last recert.

Jennifer Mcmonigle Physician, Neurology, Commack, NY private practice

I read Continuum and take the exams in then back of the book to earn self assessment cme credits.

Serdar Turhal Physician, Oncology, University Hospital

Through ASCO & ABIM materials

Ling Twohig, D.O Resident, Internal Medicine

Medstudy with MKSAP

Thomas Broner DPM Physician, Other, VA

Study by prep course, reading and practice exams, and CME course work

Thomas Broner DPM Physician, Other, VA

CME , Prep course, individual reading, practice test

LINDA FARKAS Physician, Surgery, Specialized

Study with review books

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