Advertisement

Higher Intake of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Linked to Some Endometrial Cancers — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
November 25, 2013

Higher Intake of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Linked to Some Endometrial Cancers

By Amy Orciari Herman

Among postmenopausal women, the risk for estrogen-dependent endometrial cancer increases as the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) increases, a study in Cancer Biomarkers, Epidemiology & Prevention finds.

Some 23,000 postmenopausal women completed food-frequency questionnaires in 1986, and incident cancers were assessed through 2010. Overall, 506 type I (estrogen-dependent) and 89 type II (non-estrogen-dependent) endometrial cancers occurred.

After multivariable adjustment, women in the second-highest quintile of SSB consumption (0.7-1.6 servings/week) had a 40% increased risk for type I endometrial cancer, and those in the highest quintile (1.7-60.5 servings/week) had a 74% increased risk, relative to no SSB consumption. There was no association between SSB intake and type II cancer.

The researchers say that high SSB consumption "may lead to obesity-related alteration in estrogen status, and thus increase the risk of endometrial cancer"; however, because the association became "slightly stronger" after adjustment for BMI, other factors might be involved.

Reader Comments (1)

David Wolkoff, M.D. Physician

I believe that this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to sugar and cancers. I do not believe that estrogen is the only or even primary link, either. It will be interesting to see what the response is from the medical establishment and the lay press. My suspicion is that it will be largely ignored. Which brings to mind a question I have long asked myself: 'What if we found a way to prevent most cancers, and nobody wanted to know?'

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement