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Bivalirudin During Transport for PCI in STEMI Lowers Bleeding, But Increases Stent Thrombi — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
October 31, 2013

Bivalirudin During Transport for PCI in STEMI Lowers Bleeding, But Increases Stent Thrombi

By Joe Elia

The direct thrombin inhibitor bivalirudin — when given to patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) during transport for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) — is associated with lower rates of major bleeding after PCI. However, risks for early stent thrombosis are increased sixfold, according to a New England Journal of Medicine study. The drug's maker participated in the study.

Some 2200 patients with STEMI being transported to facilities for PCI were randomized en route to begin antithrombotic treatment with either bivalirudin or with heparin and optional glycoprotein inhibitors. By 30 days, the composite outcome of death or major bleeding was lower with bivalirudin (5.1% vs. 8.5%). However, the risk for stent thrombosis within 24 hours was higher with bivalirudin (1.1% vs. 0.2%).

An editorialist observes that the "clearest findings" after two bivalirudin trials are that the drug increases stent thrombosis while reducing bleeding complications. He writes that it's "critical that clinicians weigh the relative importance of these events before selecting an antithrombotic strategy for their patients."

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