Advertisement

Unconfirmed Reports of Krokodil Abuse in U.S. — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
October 18, 2013

Unconfirmed Reports of Krokodil Abuse in U.S.

By Kelly Young

Physicians in the Chicago area suspect that the street drug krokodil, pronounced and occasionally spelled "crocodile," has reached their region after a handful of people were identified with symptoms consistent with its abuse, the Chicago Tribune reports.

Suspected cases have also been reported in Arizona and Oklahoma, according to CNN. Federal officials, however, say there have been no confirmed cases in the U.S.

The injectible drug is a homemade version of desomorphine that's made using corrosive substances, such as lighter fluid or cleaning products, to dissolve codeine tables. The drug necrotizes tissue, sometimes leading to green, scaly-looking lesions, not unlike a crocodile.

Krokodil abuse is widespread in Russia and the Ukraine, where it's a cheap alternative to heroin.

Rich Saitz, an addiction medicine specialist with Physician's First Watch, said: "When the latest abused drug gets attention, it can distract us from the more mundane but harmful effects of alcohol and other commonly abused substances. Nonetheless, it is helpful to be aware of new drugs of abuse ... to help us identify and ... treat substance use disorders."

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement