Advertisement

Maine Becomes First State to Allow Purchase of Mail-Order Drugs from Abroad — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
October 10, 2013

Maine Becomes First State to Allow Purchase of Mail-Order Drugs from Abroad

By Amy Orciari Herman

On Wednesday, Maine became the first state to allow the direct purchase of medications from foreign pharmacies, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Drug manufacturers have filed a lawsuit, saying the move puts consumers at risk for counterfeit or tainted products. Maine's governor counters, "It's not a safety issue. It's turf."

The potential for cost-savings is immense: The city of Portland has been using a Canadian broker to purchase medications for its employees for years, saving the city over $3 million between 2004 and 2012.

While the FDA forbids medication imports, consumers are rarely stopped from shopping abroad, the WSJ notes. The agency could not comment for the paper, given the current government shutdown.

Reader Comments (2)

Michael Schatman, Ph.D. Other Healthcare Professional, Other, Journal of Pain Research

This is the beginning of the end....at last. As a bioethicist, I am thrilled to see what Maine has done. Let the rest of the nation follow suit!

Barry Keller, MD Physician, Pediatrics/Adolescent Medicine, retired

While the risk of defective medications from foreign sources is real, it is also clear that the cost of medications in the US is out of sync with costs in other developed countries. A physician friend who works for a major respected pharmaceutical company pointed out that Americans are paying for medications for the rest of the world. It's time for the FDA to monitor less expensive medicines produced abroad for import so that Americans are not penalized.

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement