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Large-Scale Program Nearly Doubles Rates of Blood Pressure Control — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
August 21, 2013

Large-Scale Program Nearly Doubles Rates of Blood Pressure Control

By Amy Orciari Herman

Use of a large-scale hypertension program in a California healthcare system nearly doubled the rate of blood pressure control from 2001 to 2009. The findings are reported in JAMA.

The program, developed by Kaiser Permanente Northern California in 2000, included a system-wide hypertension registry that generated frequent reports on clinics' performances; a four-step hypertension treatment algorithm that was regularly updated according to new evidence; visits with medical assistants for BP measurements after treatment adjustments; and emphasis on single-pill therapy with lisinopril-hydrochlorothiazide (after 2005). By 2009, over 650,000 hypertensive patients were included in the registry.

The overall rate of BP control (defined as <140/90 mm Hg) within the registry rose from 44% in 2001 to 80% in 2009. At the same time, the national BP control rate increased only from 55% to 64%; changes throughout the state of California were similar to those seen nationally.

Reader Comments (1)

Ebad Ansari Physician

A good article about BP control

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