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New Risk Score Predicts Dementia in Older People with Type 2 Diabetes — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
August 20, 2013

New Risk Score Predicts Dementia in Older People with Type 2 Diabetes

By Kelly Young

A new risk score comprising diabetes-associated complications, education, and age accurately predicts dementia risk among older patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

Researchers used two cohorts of over 30,000 patients with diabetes who were aged 60 and older to construct and validate the Diabetes-Specific Dementia Risk Score (DSDRS). The final risk score — which included age, education, microvascular disease, diabetic foot, cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease, acute metabolic events, and depression — accurately predicted 10-year dementia risk. Patients with the highest DSDRS scores were 37 times more likely to be diagnosed with dementia over the subsequent decade than patients with the lowest scores.

A commentator writes: "Ease of use and ready access to complete and accurate data make DSDRS more useful than some of the previous risk scores. ... DSDRS should therefore be easy to implement."

Reader Comments (2)

ZACH ROSEN Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice, Multispecialty clinic

I'm wondering what the purpose of this study was, other than to produce more clinical trial studies (and what would the purpose of those other clinical studies be?):

"The risk score can be used to increase vigilance for cognitive deterioration and for selection of high-risk patients for participation in clinical trials."

What would 'increased vigilance' mean and what useful outcomes would there be by 'increased vigilance?'

John GILBERT Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice, Dublin, Ireland

If I were a type 2 diabetic, how much would I want to know that I was going to be demented within 10 years, knowing that there is no treatment available to prevent, cure or mitigate it?

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