Editor Profile

Steven Dubovsky, MD

Associate Editor

About the NEJM Journal Watch Psychiatry Board

Steven Dubovsky, MD, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. He also holds the position of Adjoint Professor of Psychiatry and Medicine at the University of Colorado. Dr. Dubovsky's research interests include the pathophysiology and treatment of mood disorders, psychopharmacology, interactions between medical and psychiatric illnesses, and medical education. He was the first to demonstrate increased intracellular calcium-ion signaling in bipolar mood disorders and has published more than 175 articles, books, and book chapters. Dr. Dubovsky has an active clinical practice, in which he consults on treatment-refractory psychiatric disorders. Dr. Dubovsky has written for NEJM Journal Watch Psychiatry since its inception in 1995.


Grant / Research support

Otsuka; Tower Foundation; Oshei Foundation; Patrick Lee Foundation; Wendt Foundation; Takeda; Lilly; Sumitomo; Hoffmann-La Roche; Pfizer

Editorial boards

Mind and Brain; Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic; Current Psychiatry; Journal of Psychosomatic Research

Summaries by Steven Dubovsky

  • October 5, 2015

    How Do We Reconcile Conflicts?

    1. Steven Dubovsky, MD

    Thinking through a dilemma involves the integration of intuitive and utilitarian judgments, according to this imaging study.

  • September 30, 2015

    A Predictor of PTSD Risk?

    1. Steven Dubovsky, MD

    In predeployment military personnel, low heart-rate variability is associated with PTSD onset months after their return.

  • September 11, 2015

    Reefer Madness — How Bad Is It?

    1. Steven Dubovsky, MD

    Although evidence for cannabis-associated specific structural change in a meta-analysis is weak, evidence for a link between psychotic symptoms and cannabis use is strong.

  • September 10, 2015

    Epigenetics of PTSD

    1. Steven Dubovsky, MD

    Gene expression might be altered in offspring of traumatized parents, increasing their vulnerability to stress-related disorders.

  • August 17, 2015

    A Link Between Depressive Cognition and Inflammation

    1. Steven Dubovsky, MD

    Inflammation appears to increase relative sensitivity to punishment over reward, with alterations seen in the ventral striatum and insula.

  • August 10, 2015

    PTSD 40 Years After Vietnam

    1. Steven Dubovsky, MD

    A substantial number of Vietnam War combat veterans still have PTSD, and twice as many report symptoms increasing as decreasing.